Safety


Can you swim?? Do you like alligators?? Does hypothermia bother you?? Maybe you better read this section....??

2009 Water Safety Task Force

This year as in years past the Water Safety Task Force is hard at work bringing awareness of boating safety to the public.
2009 Water Safety Task Force
Left to right: Lindsey Houchens-J. Percy Priest Hickory Lake, Tyler Matthews-Center Hill Lake, Charlie Leath-Cheatham Lake, Carolyn Bauer-Coordinator, Nashville District Water Safety Task Force, Crystal Tingle-Old Hickory Lake, Kyle Lock-Martins Fork Lake, Sarah Bates-Lake Cumberland, Mark Vaughan-J. Percy Priest Lake, Randy Hawkins-US Coast Guard Auxiliary Div. 11 Flotilla 11-02 , Dave Bishop-Nashville District Chief of Safety, Rich Rice-Lake Barkley.


Safety is enhanced by proper communications. Read the following over before you depart on your next big adventure, and keep a copy aboard if possible.

Phonetic Alphabet

The phonetic alphabet may be used to identify any letter of the Alphabet, or to spell a word or group of letters.
Letter Phonetic Spoken as:
A ALFA AL FAH
B BRAVO BRAH VO
C CHARLIE CHAR LEE
D DELTA DELL TAH
E ECHO ECK OH
F FOXTROT FOKS TROT
G GOLF GOLF
H HOTEL HOH TELL
I INDIA IN DEE AH
J JULIETT JEW LEE ETT
K KILO KEY LOH
L LIMA LEE MAH
M MIKE MIKE
N NOVEMBER NO VEM BER
O OSCAR OSS CAH
P PAPA PAH PAH
Q QUEBEC KEH BECK
R ROMEO ROW ME OH
S SIERRA SEE AIR RAH
T TANGO TANG GO
U UNIFORM YOU NEE FORM
V VICTOR VIC TAH
W WHISKEY WISS KEY
X XRAY ECKS RAY
Y YANKEE YANG KEY
Z ZULU ZOO LOO

Pronunciation of Numerals

To distinguish numerals from words having the same meaning, the PROWORD "Figures" is used preceding such numbers.
Number Spoken         Number Spoken
0 ZE-RO         5 FIFE
1 WUN         6 SIX
2 TOO         7 SEV-UN
3 TREE         8 AIT
4 FOW-ER         9 NIN-ER
Note: A hyphen represents a pause.

Number Spoken
44 FOW-ER FOW-ER
500 FIFE ZERO ZERO
7000 SEV-UN ZERO ZERO ZERO
16000 WUN SIX ZERO ZERO ZERO
14899 WUN FOW-ER AIT NIN-ER NIN-ER
*081400Z JUN 08 TIME - ZERO EIGHT ONE FOUR ZERO ZERO ZULU JUNE ZERO EIGHT
*Date-time-groups are always sent digit by digit
Decimal Points
123.6 spoken as:
FIGURES - WUN TOO TREE- DAY-SEE-MAL SIX


PROWORDS

Procedure words (prowords) are words and phrases used to speed the transmission of radiotelephone messages. The table shown below contains a list of prowords together with an explanation of each.
PROWORD MEANING
ALL AFTER All after
ALL BEFORE All before
BREAK Separation of text from other portions of the message
CORRECTION Error
DISREGARD THIS TRANSMISSION This transmission is in error-disregard it
FIGURES Numerals or numbers to follow
FROM Originators sign
INFO The addressee (s) designation immediately following are addressed for information
INITIAL The following phonetic equivalent is to be recorded as a single letter initial
I READ BACK The following is my response to the instructions to read back
I SAY AGAIN I am repeating transmissions or portion indicated
I SPELL I shall spell the next word phonetically
I VERIFY I have verified with originator and am repeating
MESSAGE A message requiring recording is about to follow
OUT End of transmission: no receipt required (Not used with OVER)
OVER Go ahead, or this is the end of my transmission, a reply is expected (Never used with OUT)
READ BACK Repeat this entire transmission back exactly as received
RELAY (TO) Transmit this message to all addressees immediately following
ROGER I have received your last transmission satisfactorily
SAY AGAIN Repeat
SPEAK SLOWER Your transmission is too fast a speed-send slower
THAT IS CORRECT Correct
THIS IS From
TIME What follows is time or Date-Time Group of this message
TO Action address
UNKNOWN STATION Unknown station
VERIFY Verify with originator and repeat
WAIT I must pause for a few seconds
WAIT OUT I must pause for more than a few seconds
WILCO I have received your message, I understand, and I will comply
WORD AFTER Word after
WORD BEFORE Word before
WORD TWICE Communication is difficult-transmit each phrase twice
(Can be used as an order or a request)
WRONG Your last transmission was incorrect " the correct version is a...".


Spelling Difficult words or groups within the text of plain text messages should be spelled using the phonetic alphabet preceded by the PROWORD "I SPELL." If you can pronounce the word to be spelled, do so before and after the spelling to identify the word.
!!Say It - Spell It - Say It Again!!
"CANTENARY - I SPELL-CHARLIE ALFA NOVEMBER TANGO ECHO NOVEMBER ALFA ROMEO YANKEE - CANTENARY".
Say It - Spell It - Say It Again; If the word sounds the same but has a different meaning. Ex. To, Too, Two.

Coded Groups If a message text contains coded groups or other words that cannot be pronounced, the phonetic equivalents of the individual letters should be transmitted, without the PROWORD I SPELL.
LOZWT in text "LIMA OSCAR ZULU WHISKEY TANGO"

Mixed Letters and Numbers If the message text contains mixed letters and numbers they will be spoken as:
12A9B Spoken "FIGURES - ONE TWO ALFA NINER BRAVO"
TS67R Spoken "I SPELL - TANGO SIERRA SIX SEVEN ROMEO"

Abbreviations Abbreviations in the text, initials used alone or in conjunction with short titles shall be spoken phonetically.
A. Spoken as "ALFA PERIOD" or ACP spoken as "I SPELL - ALFA CHARLIE PAPA".
Abbreviations frequently used in normal speech may be used in the same manner when transmitted by voice.
NATO spoken as "NATO."
USCGC DALLAS spoken as "UNITED STATES COAST GUARD CUTTER DALLAS - I SPELL - UNIFORM SIERRA CHARLIE GOLF CHARLIE - USCGC DALLAS."

Dates Dates are spoken digit by digit using the full month's name
20 AUG spoken as "TOO ZERO AUGUST."

Initials Personal initials shall be spoken phonetically, prefixed by the word "INITIALS."
W.E. LEWIS spoken as "INITIALS WHISKEY ECHO LEWIS"

Roman Numerals Transmitted as the corresponding Arabic numerals preceded by the word, "ROMAN NUMERALS."

Note: Spelling of words lengthens the time of transmission, thus increasing on-air time. Avoid spelling words unnecessarily.
Punctuation Spoken as:
Comma "COMMA"
Period "PERIOD OR FULL STOP"
Parenthesis " BRACKETS ON/ BRACKETS OFF "
Oblique Stroke "SLANT"
Hyphen "HYPHEN"
Semicolon "SEMI-COLON"
Colon "COLON"
Question Mark "QUESTION MARK"
Decimal point "DAY-SEE-MAL"

Note: Do not use "Symbol For"

How to Call and Reply Transmitting and receiving on a voice circuit will be accomplished in the following manner. Keep in mind proper circuit discipline.
Step Action
1Check your transmitter/receiver settings and verify the proper transmit/receive frequency is dialed in.
2Listen to the frequency to ensure you will not interfere with another transmission in progress.
3Speak clearly in a normal tone of voice, holding the microphone no more than an inch from your mouth.
4Avoid excessive calling and unofficial transmissions. Call signs should be transmitted only once when conditions are favorable and twice when unfavorable.
5If three attempts to contact a station are unsuccessful, send the PROWORD "Nothing Heard". Attempt to establish communications with another station and request their assistance in contacting the original unit. Continue your call-up at reasonable intervals.
6Message transmissions should be sent at such a speed as to allow accurate copying of the message. Send phrase by phrase, un-keying the microphone at regular intervals.
7Every transmission shall end with an ending PROWORD. The authorized PROWORD'S are:
"OVER" Response required
"OUT" No response required
"WAIT" The pause is for a few seconds
"WAIT OUT" The pause is more than a few seconds


VHF FREQUENCY IN MHz

CHANNEL SHIP COAST USE
16 156.800 156.800 Distress and Calling
06 156.300 156.300 Intership Safety
13 156.650 156.650 Bridge-to-bridge
15 156.750 Environmental
17 156.850 156.850 State Control
70 156.525 156.525 Digital Selective Calling
65 156.275 156.275 Port operations for intership and ship to coast.
66 156.325 156.325 Same
12 156.600 156.600 Same
73 156.675 156.675 Same
14 156.700 156.700 Same
74 156.725156.725 Same
20 156.000 161.600 Same
07 156.350 156.350 Commercial use for intership and ship to coast.
09* 156.450 156.450 Same
10 156.500 156.500 Same
11 156.550 156.550 Same
18 156.900 156.900 Same
19 156.950 156.950 Same
79 156.975156.975 Same
80 157.025 157.025 Same
67 156.375 Commercial use for intership only.
08 156.400 Same
77 156.875 Same
88 157.425 Same
68 156.425 156.425 Noncommercial use intership and ship to coast.
69 156.475 156.475 Same
71 156.575 156.575 Same
78 156.925 156.925 Same
72 156.625 Intership only.
24 157.200 161.800 Public Correspondence ship to coast (Telephone channels).
84 157.225 161.825 Same
25 157.250 161.850 Same
85 157.275 161.875 Same
26 157.300 161.900 Same
86 157.325 161.925 Same
27 157.350 161.950 Same
87 157.375 161.975 Same
28 157.400 162.000 Same
*Channel 9 is an alternate calling channel for recreational vessels

Coast Guard Frequencies

CHANNEL SHIP COAST USE
21A 157.05 157.05 Intra-Coast Guard VHF-FM working frequency for units in maritime mobile operations.
22A 157.100 157.100 Primary VHF-FM liaison frequency for communications between Coast Guard units and civilian stations. It is also used for making Coast Guard Marine Information and Marine Assistance Request Broadcasts (MARBs).
23A 157.15 157.15 Intra-Coast Guard VHF-FM working frequency used for communications between Coast Guard units working in maritime mobile operations.
81A 157.075 157.075 Intra-Coast Guard VHF-FM working frequency for units in maritime mobile operations.
83A 157.175 157.175 Intra-Coast Guard VHF-FM working frequency for units in maritime mobile operations.


MF/HF-(SSB)

Frequency (kHz) USE
2003 Intership safety frequency for Great Lakes only
2082.5 Intership safety frequency for all areas
2142 Intership safety frequency for Pacific coast area south of latitude 42o North (daytime only)
2182 International distress and calling frequency used world-wide for distress calls and for urgent message traffic. Also, ship and shore stations may use it to establish initial contact, then shift to a proper working frequency for passing operational traffic. All units must maintain radio silence on this frequency for three minutes, twice each hour, except for transmitting distress, or urgency messages, or vital navigation warnings.
2203 Intership safety frequency for Gulf of Mexico only
2638 International intership safety frequency
2670 Coast Guard working frequency used to broadcast urgent safety messages; precede messages on 2670 kHz with a preliminary announcement on 2182 kHz. Primary MF/HF Coast Guard/civilian liaison frequency.
2738 International intership safety frequency. Coast Guard and Auxiliary boats may use this frequency to communicate with other vessels in all areas, except the Great Lakes and Gulf of Mexico.
2830 Intership safety frequency for the Gulf of Mexico only
3023
and
5680
International SAR on-scene frequencies. Use either and of these frequencies to conduct communications at the scene of an emergency or as the SAR control frequency.
4125 International distress and safety, used in Alaska
5692 Aircraft working frequency
5696 Coast Guard Aircraft primary frequency (air to ground)


The links below are a few of many thousands that contain essential Boating Safety information.
Links
Current US Coast Guard Boating Alerts
U.S. Coast Guard Boating Safety
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 11-02, Old Hickory Lake, Nashville, TN
Boat Safe
Commander Bob's Boating Safety Page
North American Safe Boating Campaign
Safe Boating Kidsite Central ..... Fun & Education!
Boat Safe Kids Questions! ..... More Fun & Education!